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Taste of the Nation Takes Over New York City

Taste of the Nation Takes Over New York City


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Featuring the best of the best of New York’s chefs, mixologists, restaurateurs, and sommeliers joined together to conquer childhood hunger in America, Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry took the Big Apple by storm at the end of April.

Despite an extremely crowded venue due to the overwhelming turnout, the unlimited selection of tasty desserts, drinks, and more made this culinary-for-a-cause soiree the talk of the town. In fact, 100 percent of proceeds from the event go to benefit No Kid Hungry, which aims to end childhood hunger in America. That ought to leave a good taste in your mouth.

Guests’ dining experiences were taken to a whole new level with the event’s extensive selection of crafty cocktails, innovative sweets, and bite-size farm-to-table morsels at this signature tasting event at the mesmerizing 180 Maiden Lane on the East River Waterfront.

The organizing committee was led by honorary chair Danny Meyer (Union Square Hospitality Group) along with culinary co-chairs Anita Lo (Annisa) and Bryce Schuman (Betony), and host committee members Eli Sussman (Samesa), Chris Jaeckle (Uma Temakeria), William Elliot (Maison Premiere and Sauvage), Jack Logue (Betony), Flynn McGarry (Eureka), and Oskar Kostecki (Union Square Wines).

Taste of the Nation 2017 featured more than 40 of the city’s most popular eateries, serving the best small dishes. Participating restaurants and bars included Lalito, Union Square Cafe, Atoboy, Massoni, Pig Bleecker, Dead Rabbit, Black Tail, Pig & Khao, and Daily Provisions.

Last year, New York City’s Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry fed more than one million healthy meals to children across the city. Local beneficiaries include City Harvest, Hunger Solutions NY, Food Bank for New York City, and Hunger Free America.

Unfortunately, one in six children in this country faces hunger, including 22 percent of kids in New York. No Kid Hungry ensures kids start the day with a nutritious breakfast in the classroom and have access to the food they need in the summer, and helps families learn the skills they need to shop and cook on a budget. Since the campaign’s launch, No Kid Hungry and its partners have connected kids facing hunger to more than 500 million meals.

New York City’s Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry is supported by national presenting sponsors Citi and Sysco, national media sponsor Food Network, national sponsors OpenTable and The Glenlivet, and local sponsors Bazzini, Empire City Casino, Fenton Models, Lifeway, Loacker USA, Moishe’s Moving and Storage, Nobletree, Prosciutto di Parma, PTG, Shawmut Design and Construction, S. Pellegrino, Tito’s, TouchBistro, Virgil Kaine, and Zwilling J.A. Henckles.


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


How Mohawk ‘Skywalkers’ Helped Build New York City's Tallest Buildings

Native Americans aren’t often associated with New York City and its dense, vertical landscape. With so many Indian nations pushed to America’s frontier in the 19 th century, they usually appear in popular culture as denizens of the rural West, occupying wide open spaces replete with tipis, buffalo and pow wows. Yet the Mohawk Nation has deep roots in metropolitan New York City—where, beginning in the early 20 th century, Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, or Mohawk, ironworkers contributed to building many of the iconic skyscrapers that dominate the Manhattan skyline.

These “Skywalkers” have for generations travelled far and wide to work on the “high steel,” bringing back good wages to support their home communities such as Kahnawake, Six Nations Reserve and Akwesasne in northern New York State and southeastern Canada.

“It became a rite of passage really,” said Lynn Beauvais, a Kahnawake resident and grandmother from a fourth-generation ironworker family, in an interview with HISTORY.com. “The men were thrilled to be working away from home and seeing new sights. They were a band of brothers. But our men had always traveled𠅏or the hunt, the fur trade or as lumber men.”


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