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How to Make Your Own Thin Mints at Home Slideshow

How to Make Your Own Thin Mints at Home Slideshow


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The Dough

For our cookie, we started with a basic shortbread recipe and added a little cocoa powder to the dry ingredients. To the butter and sugar, we added peppermint extract to get that mint flavor that we’ve all come to know and love in our Thin Mints.

Thinning a Thin Mint

They’re not called Thin Mints for nothing. To get our cookies nice and skinny, we rolled the dough out into golf ball-sized rounds and gave them a little smash with the bottom of a glass.

The Cookie

Our baked cookies were crisp, rustically round, and delicious. So delicious that some may have met their demise before getting a coat of chocolate icing.

The Chocolate Coat

Speaking of which, we were pretty darn sure about one thing when it came to the chocolate coat of a thin mint: it had to be dark chocolate. A lot of imitation recipes out there just melt chocolate and butter together for a Thin Mint’s coat, but we got ambitious and added a little peppermint extract to it, too.

Bathtime

Now it’s time for some skinny dipping (literally!). First we dunked the bottom of the cookie in a bath of peppermint dark chocolate before placing it on a parchment-lined baking sheet to be showered in a drizzle of the chocolate on top.

The Daily Meal’s Thin Mint

Our Thin Mints we’re chocolaty, fulfilling, and homespun. They retained all of the delicious qualities we love in the Girl Scouts’ original cookie, with just a hint of homemade flair.

Click here to see the recipe.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

Thanks for visiting Consumerist.com. As of October 2017, Consumerist is no longer producing new content, but feel free to browse through our archives. Here you can find 12 years worth of articles on everything from how to avoid dodgy scams to writing an effective complaint letter. Check out some of our greatest hits below, explore the categories listed on the left-hand side of the page, or head to CR.org for ratings, reviews, and consumer news.

Make Your Own Thin Mints When The Girl Scouts Aren't Around

2.1.11 1:30 PM EDT By Phil Villarreal

Like other delicacies such as the McRib and eggnog, Girl Scout cookies only come around every so often, leaving you to spend your time craving them in abject misery. But anyone with a cookie sheet and the ability to follow directions can easily make the latter for themselves.

Seattle Weekly cracks the code to deliver recipes for several varieties of Girl Scout cookies. You can enjoy them yourself or don a sash and take some batches door-to-door to undersell those price-gouging little girls. (Not really, we’re just kidding. Don’t do that.):

Here’s the “Homemade Thin Mints” recipe, with ingredients first:

1/2 cup of butter (softened)
1/4 tsp of salt
1 cup of white sugar
1 egg
1 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp of mint extract
1/2 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder
3 squares of semisweet chocolate (chopped)
1/4 cup of butter

Begin by preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Stir together the sugar and softened butter until the mixture is creamy, then beat in the egg and add the mint extract. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, and salt. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture.

At this point, my friends and I deviated from the online recipe. The recipe directed us to refrigerate the dough for about five hours. We had no such time, so we left it in for about 40 minutes while we watched an episode of Jersey Shore online. Perhaps this is the reason our cookies did not taste exactly like Girl Scout cookies.

Roll out the dough until it’s 1/4 of an inch thick. Use a round cookie-cutter to form the cookies, then toss them in the oven for about 12 minutes. When the cookies are baked, melt 1/4 of a cup of butter (or about half of a stick) together with the chocolate in the microwave or on the stovetop. Dip the cookies in the melted mixture and set them on wax paper until the chocolate hardens.

This recipe makes about four dozen cookies.

If you’ve ever tried to bake your own Girl Scout cookies, let us know how they turned out.

Want more consumer news? Visit our parent organization, Consumer Reports, for the latest on scams, recalls, and other consumer issues.


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