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A California Brasserie Opens in Los Angeles

A California Brasserie Opens in Los Angeles


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Comfort food and French-focused libations come together at Terrine on Beverly

Terrine’s back patio is widely regarded as one of the most romantic dining locations in Los Angeles.

Restaurateur Stephane Bombet of Bombet Hospitality Group and chef Kris Morningstar have opened Terrine in the former Pane e Vino space on Beverly Boulevard in L.A.

Designed by Bombet along with managing partner and wine director François Renaud, the restaurant is divided evenly between indoor and outdoor spaces. The al fresco patio located at the back of the eatery is widely regarded as one of the most romantic dining locations in Los Angeles, featuring a nearly 20-year-old tree that remains as the focal point of the space.

Inside, a whitewashed exposed brick wall is complemented by warm wood and accents of glass and copper throughout, including a copper and marble bar. The redesigned kitchen features a large window facing the dining room, allowing guests to observe the action inside. Adjacent to the bar is a large wood-burning pizza oven and a visible wine cellar storing up to 1,000 bottles.

The dishes focus on American comfort food with French flair, and include fried cheese curds with basil pesto, smoked tuna tartare crostini, stuffed bone marrow, squid ink campanelle with crab, truffled rice agnolotti, a variety of pizzas, boudin noir, fish and chips, and côte de bœuf.

The mostly French wine list includes 15 wines by the glass and a selection of nearly 100 bottles of whites, reds, and sparklers. The bar program is helmed by Ryan Wainwright, who provides his own interpretations of classic cocktails such as the Jack Rose with apple brandy, citrus, and pomegranate; the Rob Roy with scotch, chinato, and angostura; and the Honeysuckle with aged rum, lime, and honey.


Flying Embers Opens Los Angeles Art District Brewery and Social Club

OJAI, Calif. — Flying Embers, the better-for-you alcohol brand, has announced the opening of the Flying Embers Brewery & Social Club in a reconstructed 100 year old warehouse building in downtown Los Angeles’ historic arts district. Their tap room and bar features an experienced and knowledgeable team serving a unique range of Flying Embers hard kombuchas and hard seltzers on tap, specialty cocktails using their range of innovative botanical brews, better-for-you beers with adaptogens, and an extensive ranges of handcrafted non alcoholic cocktails. Flying Embers has also partnered with an Los Angeles Art’s District favorite restaurant, Comfort LA, to serve better-for-you, soul comfort food.

The new venue will follow California’s COVID-19 pandemic guidelines. With all tables six feet apart and window ordering, visitors will be able to watch the home sports games on a massive projector screen and sit inside or in the open air dock in patio seating. The facilities are cleaned daily and the venue boasts a superior air filtration system.

Flying Embers has also added three key new staff to the rapidly expanding brand: head Brewmaster Jeremy Czuleger, Taproom General Manager Holly Mattson, and Speciality Brewing and Innovation lead Margaux Moses.

New Flying Embers head Brewmaster Jeremy Czuleger is a specialist in mixed fermentation and barrel aging delicious libations while sourcing local ingredients, a unique combination of interests and skills developed from over a decade of professional brewing. He previously held the honor of Specialty Beer Manager at Freemont Brewing, and before was Head Brewer at Brouwerij West and Lead Brewer at Trumer Brewery. Czuleger has extensive hands-on experience building breweries from the ground-up, spending the last few years overseeing a 30+ barrel brewing system and charging the lead with crafting new, inventive recipes. His personal relationship with local farmers, growers and suppliers led to successful and creative brews.

“I’m incredibly honored,” says Czuleger. “I find great joy in crafting beers that are highly complex yet also drinkable. I’m excited to continue doing what I love at a place that will give me such a creative space to be innovate.

Holly Mattson joins Flying Embers as the Flying Ember’s Brewery & Social Club General Manager. Having worked in hospitality for over 16 years at some of LAs hottest locals, Mattson served as F&B manager at The Standard West Hollywood, the F&B Director of Petitermitage Hotel, the GM at both The Houston Brothers, No Vacancyla and Apotheke LA.

“Opening the Taprooms during quarantine has been a challenging, yet exciting process. Being able to open the doors to the public and make in person connections with our Flying Embers fans has brought this experience to life,” says Mattson. I personally love bringing a unique and creative menu to life that really plays with the nuances of the many flavor profiles of our Hard Kombuchas, Seltzers and Active Ales. For those sober curious, we have also created plenty to offer. What I love most about Flying Embers? – our better for you approach.”

Speciality Brewing and Innovation lead Margaux Moses joins Flying Embers with a passion and commitment to healing. Moses sets out to brew for greater health and wellness, exploring plant based ingredients that reveal the connection between mind and body. Her passion for craft beer and libations is backed by an education and vast experience with herbalism. Her brewing process draws on wisdom from the alchemy explorations of Europe, Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Wise Woman tradition and more. She has spent years creating fermentations using ingredients that nourish the body, feed the cells, soothe the nervous system, and awaken the body & spirit.

Margaux Moses explains, “I’m so excited about being on the Flying Embers team because everyone is so forward thinking and innovative. I’m fascinated by the alchemy of plant material and fermentation, where we as a brand are doing are so much. The thing is there are so many magical and potent plants on our beautiful Earth. And as wonderful as hops are, there is so much more to explore, and I plan to do it! At Flying Embers DTLA I will continue to play and push the envelope, and offer events, experiences, and resources the community to dive into this plant world with us.”

Flying Embers has been a rising star in the better for you beverage scene as of late, and is one of the many exciting projects from Fermented Sciences out of Ojai, CA. Started by Bill Moses, co-founder and former CEO of KeVita non-alcoholic kombucha (now owned by PepsiCo), the company prides itself in being experts in the art and science of fermentation. In just 2020 Flying Embers launched new products including a Hard Seltzer line, multiple unique flights of Hard Kombucha flavors, as well as a flavor collaboration with reggae musician Stick Figure. Flying Embers Hard Seltzer is the world’s first probiotic-powered hard seltzer with antioxidants and all USDA organic ingredients.

Flying Embers’ is a conscious brand that’s dedicated to doing its part in building a better world. As healthy living and mindful drinking converge, Flying Embers stands by innovation and crafting libations that have better ingredients for you that actually matter. The Flying Embers commitment to innovation and the company’s advancement in fermentation have led to a core lineup of 6 unique hard kombucha flavors ranging from 4.5% to 7.2% ABV. All 6 flavors are 0 sugars, 0 carbs with live probiotics and brewed with an adaptogen root blend.

Flying Embers has grown exponentially and is now distributed in over 40 states and is available through delivery apps and retailers, and through the Flying Embers website, offering direct delivery to many states with 2 hour delivery in LA and NYC.


Where else to eat caviar in the city:

At Angler, Joshua Skenes wraps his own reserve caviar in banana leaves and warms it over the fire of his expansive hearth. The caviar is served with a barbecue banana-peel butter and a banana pancake. When Skenes first told us about the banana pancake a few days before Angler opened in June, he admitted that it “sounds ridiculous as I’m saying it out loud.” But the sweet, savory, briny, and smoky elements he’s merged together are tremendously satisfying. Skenes, by the way, uses seawater to make his own smoked salt for the caviar.


Comme Ca or Osteria Mozza

I will be heading down to LA from SF over the weekend in late April and am deciding between the Comme Ca and Osteria Mozza.

We will be a party of 4, all in our mid-20s. I understand the basic differences: French Brasserie vs. Italian Rustic.

This past Winter I was in NYC but tried a month in advance to get into Babbo but those phone lines were ridiculous and I was on hold for over 30 minutes (I started calling 5 minutes before opening). So Osteria Sounds good, for the Pasta and the Rustic food, similar somewhat to Babbo. I have been to Pizzeria Mozza and thought it was good, not great, but good.

As for Comme Ca, I haven't had French Brasserie food in awhile and I heard its a very loud and festive atmosphere with Good Food and drinks.

I seems like both a are in a similar price range.

My main priorities are good food and enjoyable surroundings to spend time with friends I don't see often. Thanks in Advance for your suggestions.


Joshua Skenes Has Big Plans for Angler and Hotly Anticipated L.A. Location

This spring, the 2011 Food & Wine Best New Chef will cook sustainable California seafood over open fire at the Beverly Center. Unlike Saison, Angler is a restaurant that Skenes has designed to be scalable.

The story of the king crab that ate 27 spot prawns at Angler might sound far-fetched, but it’s also just what happens when a predator encounters prey.

At Angler, a seafood-focused restaurant that opened on the Embarcadero in San Francisco last September, chef Joshua Skenes wants the dishes to taste as natural as possible. The space has tanks for live seafood, and a biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium worked with Skenes to “sustain the correct biological environment” for crustaceans in the restaurant.

“So it ends up tasting like the ocean and not like a tank,” the chef says. “We’ve got seaweed in there that’s live, and we put things together. King crabs apparently like spot prawns. King crabs usually eat whatever they want. They’ve eaten lobster and other things.”

This might sound unfortunate for a restaurant that spends a lot of effort and money procuring sustainable California seafood, but Skenes does see an upside. Eating other crustaceans makes a king crab more delicious. Plus, Skenes has a financial solution. He simply adds the value of the seafood consumed by a king crab to the menu price for the crab. The way the food chain works in San Francisco means that the king crab that ate 27 spot prawns was purchased for $1,540 and grilled at Angler, which has an open kitchen with an expansive wood-burning hearth as its centerpiece.

By the way, Angler is the more casual of the two San Francisco restaurants founded by Skenes, whose tasting-menu destination Saison recently maintained its three Michelin stars with new executive chef Laurent Gras.

Skenes, who was named a 2011 Food & Wine Best New Chef for his work at Saison, is serving incredible seafood at Angler. But unlike Saison, Angler is a restaurant that Skenes has designed to be scalable. Angler, with its “simple” mission of getting the freshest ingredients and cooking them over open fire, plans to open an L.A. location at the Beverly Center in the spring. There’s a chance that L.A.’s Angler debuts in April, but Skenes is wise enough to know that 𠇌onstruction is the devil,” so he’s not ready to announce a specific date.

The L.A. space will be larger than the one in San Francisco, so Skenes will have a bigger, better-equipped kitchen for his open-fire setup. That’s one advantage of moving into a brand-new space rather than inhabiting something that had previously housed another restaurant. (The San Francisco location was previously home to Chaya Brasserie.) San Francisco’s Angler has about 100 seats, and there might be 20 more in L.A.

Dinner at Angler in San Francisco can easily cost more than $100 per person with alcohol. Skenes says the L.A. outpost will be similarly priced, but he knows that being in a different city means making some adjustments. (There are also plans for a Seattle Angler, in the Bellevue area, that might open in 2021.) A lot of it will depend on what ingredients Skenes gets in Southern California.

“It’s all based on the product,” he says. “We’re in the R&D phase, and it’s about getting what exists locally. I really love L.A. and Orange County and all the surrounding areas. There’s so much great shit down there. My wife is from Orange County, and her family grows like every fruit that exists in their backyard. It’s fucking Jumanji. It’s amazing. There’s dragonfruit and all the herbs you see at a Vietnamese restaurant. There’s jackfruit and all kinds of citrus.”

Skenes is also excited to see what Southern California fishermen send him.

𠇏ishing in Northern California is hard, man,” Skenes says. “I respect the shit out of the fishermen out here because it’s so turbulent and the coastline is so rough. I’m not saying fishing in Southern California is easy in any way, but it’s not as punishing. Maybe there will be a little more variety of some species.”

It might sound funny to say that one of L.A.’s biggest restaurant openings in 2019 will be a mall restaurant that’s an outpost of something already in another city. But the Beverly Center, which already includes Cal Mare, Yardbird, and Farmhouse, is creating a formidable dining collection. And San Francisco’s Angler, which Food & Wine named as one of 2018’s biggest openings, is as high-profile as any new restaurant in the country. Esquire’s Jeff Gordinier named it as his best new restaurant of 2018. Newly appointed New York Times California restaurant critic Tejal Rao has also raved about Angler.

Most of the seafood that Angler serves is from the California coast, including Santa Barbara and Humboldt County. (An exception I enjoyed on a recent visit to Angler in San Francisco was a pristine scallop from Maine day-boat legend Sue Buxton, who also supplies scallops to other great restaurants like L.A.’s Viale dei Romani.) There are big plates of resplendent little abalone. There’s an over-the-top presentation of black truffle shaved atop a luxurious Dungeness crab porridge.

As Rao wrote in her review of Angler, the current commercial season for Dungeness crab in parts of Northern California was delayed because of a high level of domoic acid, an algae-produced neurotoxin that’s linked to climate change. In Humboldt County, for example, the season didn’t start until January 25, after multiple delays. Having Dungeness crab seems like a gift now, and Angler is making the most of it.

Angler isn’t a restaurant that wants to pound you over the head with details about its food. With the exception of oysters and clams, there isn’t any information on the menu about where seafood is sourced. (The menu does point out that the butter served with bread is made with dairy from Petaluma cows, which might answer one question about why bread and butter cost $12. One bite of the wonderful Parker House rolls might answer another question.) Skenes says he likes the fast-paced energy and attentive-but-not-cloying service at restaurants like Mr. Chow in Beverly Hills, where the goal is giving customers a high-end dining experience that also seems simple and fun “without the stories and silliness.”

The San Francisco Angler’s dining area, with its taxidermied animals and big, comfortable chairs, is designed for a relaxing experience. For dessert, there’s a soft-serve sundae with caramel warmed by the fire. It’s like the best version of a McDonald’s dessert.

“It’s about a great meal,” Skenes says. “It’s a hedonistic approach. We don’t want to educate people. We just want people to have a good time.”

Many diners at Angler might never learn that Skenes serves antelope tartare because he appreciates how the farms he uses in California and Texas lets antelopes roam free and forage, which results in meat that tastes wild.

“It tastes like a real meat, not like grain or corn,” says Skenes, who is an avid hunter and fisherman himself.

Another standout meat dish on the seafood-heavy menu is a whole pastured chicken, prepared in the style of Beijing duck cooked over open fire. At Angler, Skenes is mainly burning hickory and oak, along with some almond wood and fruit woods, in his hearth. His goal with the chicken was to figure out how to simultaneously cook the breast, thigh, and skin perfectly. He succeeded. The meat is moist, the skin crackles, and there’s a hint of smokiness that might indeed remind you of wood-and-coal-fired Beijing duck but also should satisfy fans of Texas barbecue chicken.

All this said, one of the most memorable dishes I ate at Angler was neither seafood nor meat. It was a plate of radicchio. I guess you could call this thing a salad, but the dish splashes and gushes in a way that resembles blood. That’s why you get a bib when you order it. The radicchio is topped with a combination of reduced beet juice, soy sauce, shallots, and garlic that magically creates something like the flavor and texture of XO sauce without any dried seafood or pork. Bar director Brandyn Tepper smiled as he looked at our table and said that the dish comes with 𠇊 huge mess.” The mess seems like a vital ingredient.

Even eating vegetables at Angler can feel like a primal experience. The bibs are a statement of purpose. It’s fine to make a mess. The goal is to make a mess. Nature, of course, is about messes. It’s about crazy colors and flavors and textures. It’s about predators devouring prey before being eaten themselves.

“The whole idea is to get everything as close to nature as possible, to take it out of the ocean and just grill it, to take it right out of the dirt and use it quickly,” Skenes says. “It’s all really simple, man. It’s the way it should be, but it’s a rarity in a regular restaurant setting in America. … The rest of the world knows this already. They’ve known this for a long time. You go to Spain and you go to Italy and you go to Japan, and there’s a built-in system. You get some live stuff and you cook it.”

Skenes hopes to see more chefs and restaurants in America take this approach to food. That would result in better infrastructure for ingredients, more readily available product, and lower prices for fresh items. Either way, he’s going to keep building his network of fishermen and reaching out to “small vessels.” He’ll keep serving lesser-known ingredients like moon jellyfish and invasive purple sea urchin. He’ll keep using seawater to create smoked salt for Angler’s private-batch caviar.

“Hopefully, one day we’ll have a scallop fishery,” says Skenes, who adds that the Pacific Ocean has lovely pink scallops.

I think he’s telling me this at least partially because he knows I ate a Maine scallop at his restaurant. He understand that it was an excellent scallop, and he gets why his team wants to serve it, but he’s also having a hard time reconciling it with the rest of the menu. He stresses that the vast majority of seafood he’s served at Angler has been from California. He might not feel the desire to tell his customers the backstory about all his seafood, but he wants the story to make sense in his head.


Share All sharing options for: Terrine, An Elegant California Brasserie Opening December 12 on Beverly Blvd

In the world of restaurants, sometimes things come together like an Oscar contender, pitting known quantities and proven characters into a lavish, yet ambitious production. Terrine is a such a place, starting with Stephane Bombet, who helped build Ricardo Zarate's trio of restaurants before teaming up with Coastal Luxury Management 2014's Downtown hit, Faith & Flower.

And now Bombet is partnered with chef Kris Morningstar, who helmed Ray's & Stark Bar for years, along with managing partner François Renaud, who oversaw the wine program and front of house at Venice's The Tasting Kitchen for nearly four years. Rounding out the cast is Ryan Wainwright, who also trained and worked at The Tasting Kitchen.

Back to Terrine, the concept is simple, populist, and seasonal, which will ideally reach out to a wide range of potential diners. Morningstar is banking on classical French techniques and employing them on the bounty of California's ingredients, with such dishes as housemade boudin noir, fish & chips, and duck & mushroom casoncelli. Drinks by Wainwright include a Honeysuckle, mixing aged rum, lime and honey, or a Rob Roy, essentially a Manhattan made with scotch, chinato, and bitters.

As for the interior, it's a mighty change from the gaudy environs of Sirena, which crashed and burned in less than a year. In its stead comes a wide open dining room with antique appointments (with much of the bounty garnered from estate sales and swap meets), bistro-style wooden chairs, and comfy banquettes. Bombet and Renaud also retained that remarkable patio, which features a lovely old tree in the center.

Reservations are currently open on Open Table and Resy (which launches today), with the official opening scheduled for December 12.


New $1.7B Los Angeles International Airport concourse opens

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A massive new $1.73 billion concourse with 15 gates opened Monday at Los Angeles International Airport.

Known as West Gates, it will serve both international and domestic flights.

“This is a big day in a big city that’s building out a big new infrastructure,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said during an opening ceremony.

The 4½-year construction project was part of a $14.5 billion airport modernization project.

Located just west of the Tom Bradley International Terminal, the five-level, 750,000-square-foot (69,677-square-meter) West Gates concourse is 1,700 feet (518 meters) long.

Officials said it is based around a digitally based travel experience, including biometric boarding gates, thousands of places to plug in and access wireless internet — with 5G later this year — and touchscreen kiosks.

There are two nursing rooms, three play areas for children and a relief area for service animals.

The airport described the West Gates’ baggage handling and boarding system as the most advanced in the U.S.

The airport improvement project involves all of the airport’s passenger terminals. New facilities include an automated people mover train, a consolidated rental car facility and a parking structure for 4,300 vehicles.

And a new metro station will at long last connect the airport to Los Angeles County’s light rail system.


9 Signature Dishes

Tastes evolve, but certain restaurant classics stand the test of time.

Why do certain dishes remain fixed on restaurant menus for decades while others come and go? The answer is simple: they are unwaveringly, irresistibly good. What’s more, by virtue of their staying power, they offer windows onto the eras in which they were born. Here are nine of our favorite signature restaurant dishes from around the country, listed in order of the years they were invented.

1. Bookbinder’s Famous Snapper Soup _(Old Original Bookbinder’s, Philadelphia 1865) _Turtle soup was to the 1860s what duck a l’orange was to the 1960s: the epitome of fine dining. This veal stock-based soup with delicate snapping turtle meat is prepared as it’s always been at Bookbinder’s. You can find versions of it at old-guard restaurants around the country, including the Cape Cod Room at Chicago’s Drake Hotel, where, curiously, it’s billed as “The Drake’s Signature Bookbinder Soup”.

2. Oysters Rockefeller _(Antoine’s, New Orleans 1889) _When Jules Alciatore of Antoine’s invented this dish, oysters were all the rage in New Orleans and other coastal cities. As their popularity spread inland with refrigerated railcars, so did demand for elegant ways to prepare the shellfish. When chefs started copying the Antoine’s dish, they smothered oysters in butter, spinach, bread crumbs, and other toppings and broiled them on the half shell. But the original recipe (still a closely guarded secret) calls for pureeing all of the ingredients into a rich paste and piping them into the oysters’ shells before they are baked.

3. Lobster Savannah (Locke-Ober, Boston, Massachusetts circa 1930) Though it originated down South, lobster Savannah has been inextricably associated with the Yankee restaurant Locke-Ober since the Great Depression. A mix of lobster, mushrooms, pimentos, sherry, bechamel, and parmesan that’s baked in the lobster’s shell, the dish is similar to other extravagant classics like lobster thermidor and lobster newburg. When Lydia Shire took over at Locke-Ober, in 2001, she introduced a lighter sauce and replaced the pimentos with fresh red bell peppers.

4. Orange Beef (Shun Lee Palace, New York City 1971) There was a time when Chinese food in this country meant (Americanized) Cantonese food. With the opening of Shun Lee Palace on New York’s Upper East Side in 1971, the savvy restaurateur Michael Tong made it his mission to expand people’s notions of what a Chinese restaurant could be with sophisticated dishes from Shanghai, Beijing, Sichuan, and Hunan. Thus his orange beef, which pairs crisp-fried filet with bittersweet preserved orange, a take on a Hunan specialty. Nowadays, we rarely encounter a Chinese restaurant that doesn’t serve it.

5. Baked Goat Cheese with Garden Lettuces (Chez Panisse, Berkeley, California 1981) Though salads with medallions of warm, bread crumb-coated goat cheese are now somewhat of a cliche, the one served in Chez Panisse’s upstairs cafe still tastes like the revelation it was when chef Alice Waters introduced it, 28 years ago. At the time, French-style goat cheese was largely unknown in the States, and baby lettuces came as a delicious shock to diners raised on iceberg and romaine.

6. House Smoked Salmon Pizza (Spago, Beverly Hills, California 1982) Beginning in the late 󈨊s, Wolfgang Puck put a distinctly glamorous spin on California cuisine, and with the opening of Spago, in 1982, he minted the genre of the “gourmet pizza”. Puck says he created his most famous pie on the fly one night, when the actress Joan Collins ordered smoked salmon with brioche and he realized he was out of bread. Thinking fast, he covered a just-baked pizza crust with dill-infused creme fraiche, arranged cold smoked salmon on top, and finished it off with a generous dollop of caviar.

7. Chicken for Two Roasted in the Brick Oven (Zuni Cafe, San Francisco, California 1987) Sometimes a dish has a seismic effect, not because of a radical combination of ingredients but simply because it’s the best of its kind. The sublime chicken that Judy Rodgers roasts in a wood-fired oven and serves with a Tuscan-style bread salad at Zuni Cafe is a case in point. The secret? Salting the bird 24 to 72 hours in advance. The salt slightly cures the flesh, yielding succulent and intensely flavorful results.

8. Black Cod with Miso _(Nobu, New York City 1994) _You could say that without this dish—which calls for a traditional Japanese technique of gently pickling fish in sweet saikyo miso—there would be no Nobu. It was a version of it at chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s Los Angeles sushi restaurant that kept Robert De Niro coming back for more. De Niro eventually persuaded the chef to partner with him in opening Nobu in New York in 1994. Today, black cod with miso is a favorite at all 18 Nobu restaurants (and countless imitators) worldwide.

9. Jean-Georges Chocolate Cake (Jean Georges, New York City 1997) Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s most famous dessert is commonly listed on other chefs’ menus these days as “molten chocolate cake” or “chocolate lava cake”. On the face of it, the confection appears to be nothing more than an individual chocolate cake baked in a fluted mold, but dive in, and a luscious, oozing center reveals itself. Vongerichten claims he invented the dessert by accident when he underbaked a cake while working at the restaurant Lafayette in New York. Little did he know it would go on to become the signature dessert of the 1990s.


Ojai, CA (OCTOBER 29, 2020) - Flying Embers, the better-for-you alcohol brand, has announced the opening of the Flying Embers Brewery & Social Club in a reconstructed 100 year old warehouse building in downtown Los Angeles&rsquo historic arts district. Their tap room and bar features an experienced and knowledgeable team serving a unique range of Flying Embers hard kombuchas and hard seltzers on tap, specialty cocktails using their range of innovative botanical brews, better-for-you beers with adaptogens, and an extensive ranges of handcrafted non alcoholic cocktails. Flying Embers has also partnered with an Los Angeles Art's District favorite restaurant, Comfort LA, to serve better-for-you, soul comfort food.

The new venue will follow California&rsquos COVID-19 pandemic guidelines. With all tables six feet apart and window ordering, visitors will be able to watch the home sports games on a massive projector screen and sit inside or in the open air dock in patio seating. The facilities are cleaned daily and the venue boasts a superior air filtration system.

Flying Embers has also added three key new staff to the rapidly expanding brand: head Brewmaster Jeremy Czuleger, Taproom General Manager Holly Mattson, and Speciality Brewing and Innovation lead Margaux Moses.

New Flying Embers head Brewmaster Jeremy Czuleger is a specialist in mixed fermentation and barrel aging delicious libations while sourcing local ingredients, a unique combination of interests and skills developed from over a decade of professional brewing. He previously held the honor of Specialty Beer Manager at Freemont Brewing, and before was Head Brewer at Brouwerij West and Lead Brewer at Trumer Brewery. Czuleger has extensive hands-on experience building breweries from the ground-up, spending the last few years overseeing a 30+ barrel brewing system and charging the lead with crafting new, inventive recipes. His personal relationship with local farmers, growers and suppliers led to successful and creative brews.

&ldquoI&rsquom incredibly honored,&rdquo says Czuleger. &ldquoI find great joy in crafting beers that are highly complex yet also drinkable. I&rsquom excited to continue doing what I love at a place that will give me such a creative space to be innovate.

Holly Mattson joins Flying Embers as the Flying Ember&rsquos Brewery & Social Club General Manager. Having worked in hospitality for over 16 years at some of LAs hottest locals, Mattson served as F&B manager at The Standard West Hollywood, the F&B Director of Petit Ermitage Hotel, the GM at Apotheke LA and the GM at The Houston Brothers, No VacancyLA.

&ldquoOpening the Taprooms during quarantine has been a challenging, yet exciting process. Being able to open the doors to the public and make in person connections with our Flying Embers fans has brought this experience to life,&rdquo says Mattson. I personally love bringing a unique and creative menu to life that really plays with the nuances of the many flavor profiles of our Hard Kombuchas, Seltzers and Active Ales. For those sober curious, we have also created plenty to offer. What I love most about Flying Embers? - our better for you approach.&rdquo

Speciality Brewing and Innovation lead Margaux Moses joins Flying Embers with a passion and commitment to healing. Moses sets out to brew for greater health and wellness, exploring plant based ingredients that reveal the connection between mind and body. Her passion for craft beer and libations is backed by an education and vast experience with herbalism. Her brewing process draws on wisdom from the alchemy explorations of Europe, Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Wise Woman tradition and more. She has spent years creating fermentations using ingredients that nourish the body, feed the cells, soothe the nervous system, and awaken the body & spirit.

Margaux Moses explains, &ldquoI&rsquom so excited about being on the Flying Embers team because everyone is so forward thinking and innovative. I&rsquom fascinated by the alchemy of plant material and fermentation, where we as a brand are doing are so much. The thing is there are so many magical and potent plants on our beautiful Earth. And as wonderful as hops are, there is so much more to explore, and I plan to do it! At Flying Embers DTLA I will continue to play and push the envelope, and offer events, experiences, and resources the community to dive into this plant world with us.&rdquo

Flying Embers has been a rising star in the better for you beverage scene as of late, and is one of the many exciting projects from Fermented Sciences out of Ojai, CA. Started by Bill Moses, co-founder and former CEO of KeVita non-alcoholic kombucha (now owned by PepsiCo), the company prides itself in being experts in the art and science of fermentation. In just 2020 Flying Embers launched new products including a Hard Seltzer line, multiple unique flights of Hard Kombucha flavors, as well as a flavor collaboration with reggae musician Stick Figure. Flying Embers Hard Seltzer is the world&rsquos first probiotic-powered hard seltzer with antioxidants and all USDA organic ingredients.

Flying Embers&rsquo is a conscious brand that's dedicated to doing its part in building a better world. As healthy living and mindful drinking converge, Flying Embers stands by innovation and crafting libations that have better ingredients for you that actually matter. The Flying Embers commitment to innovation and the company&rsquos advancement in fermentation have led to a core lineup of 6 unique hard kombucha flavors ranging from 4.5% to 7.2% ABV. All 6 flavors are 0 sugars, 0 carbs with live probiotics and brewed with an adaptogen root blend.

Flying Embers has grown exponentially and is now distributed in over 40 states and is available through delivery apps and retailers, and through the Flying Embers website, offering direct delivery to many states with 2 hour delivery in LA and NYC.


ABOUT

Cassia is a member of the Rustic Canyon Family and is a partnership between husband-and-wife duos Bryant & Kim Ng and Josh Loeb & Zoe Nathan.

Taking its roots from Bryant and Kim’s culinary heritage and experiences, Cassia celebrates the fresh, vibrant flavors of Southeast Asia, striking a unique balance of soulful, ancestral cuisine and a California sensibility, utilizing the best quality ingredients from local farmers.